The Sun in Time



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The Sun in Time

Since 1990, Guinan, with collaborators D. Dorren (Edinburgh, Scot.), M. Güdel(PSI, Switzerland), L. DeWarf, G. McCook and S. Messina (Catania, Italy), has been engaged in the Sun in Time project. This is a program of coordinated, multiwavelength observations of solar-type stars. These stars have been selected as proxies for the Sun at stages throughout its main-sequence lifetime; they are single, main-sequence G0 - G5 stars of ages from 70 Myr (representing the ZAMS Sun) to stars that have reached the Terminal Age Main-Sequence (TAMS) with an age of 10 Gyr. With the exception of a few, nearby, TAMS G0-5 IV stars, all of the stars have similar physical properties such as: mass, radius, temperature, and depth of convective-zone. They differ only in age, rotation and level of magnetic activity.

During 1995, observations of the G2 V, K2 V and M5 V stars of the Cen ABC star system were made by Guinan with the IUE satellite. These observations were carried out about twice per week over an three month interval from May to August 1995, to obtain the rotation periods of the three stars( Cen A: G2 V; Cen B: K2 V; and Cen C = Proxima Cen: M5 V) which form this nearby system. The chief aim is to obtain the rotation periods of the component stars by using the chromospheric and transition emission line features, arising from active stellar active sites, as markers for measuring rotation. The emission lines of O I (1305Å), C II (1335Å), C IV (1550Å), Si II (1809Å) and Mg II (2800Å) were chiefly used. Some of the data has been reduced and analyzed and the preliminary results indicate a rotation period of days for Proxima. For Cen B, the rotation period is about days. The period for Cen A is more difficult to determine because the chromospheric and TR UV line emissions are relatively weak, but there seems to be some evidence of a periodicity of about days. This period determination for Cen A, is tentative while the rotational periods for the Cen B and C appear well determined. This work is done in collaboration with astronomy students Erich Jay ( Cen A) and Nicholas Morgan (Proxima Cen). Visiting scientist, S. Messina (Univ. of Catania) is working with Guinan on the analysis of the observations of Cen B and with the overall interpretation of the results. DeWarf and Dorren are involved with the modeling and interpretation of the results. This work is partially supported by grants from the NASA IUE programs.



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Next: Pulsating Red Stars Up: CURRENT RESEARCH Previous: Contact Binaries



Astronomy
Mon Feb 26 18:11:01 EST 1996